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The Top Five Models in My Collection

Updated: Jan 3

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At present time, my steadily growing collection of 1:400 scale models sits at around 280 pieces. While a modest size, it is still a lot of models that I had to mentally sort through to pick the favorite five.


But after a while, the first three easily came out. These are models that I have had since my first stint with 1:400 scale around 2009; a time in which it wasn’t clear if the few models I had were part of a collection or a set of decorative items that packed a huge amount of sentimental value. Number four also came out fairly easy, as you will see, but when it came to choosing the fifth one among 280+ pieces, there was a lot of soul-searching involved before the clear owner of the title was chosen.


Without further ado, the top 5 models of the YV400 collection:


Number 5:


Aeropostal Boeing 727-224 Adv. N79749 “Christine” by Phoenix Models


This model has a lot of pros in many areas. First, It is one of those older models that are simple but to the point. Attention to even the smallest of details of the livery was given, and the printing and built are just good.


Second, it is a model of a Venezuelan airline, the second one produced in 1:400 scale in fact. And not any airline, but the country's oldest airline (airline brand at least).


Additionally, the model was released in 2004 and I got it in 2009, which meant that I had to look for it for a while and that always makes me value a model more.


The final reason why I like this model so very much among the 280+ in my collection is also the reason why it is the last one on this list. I actually got to see this aircraft in person and was able to even take a picture of it with my very first digital camera. However, this also means that I was already old enough when this aircraft was in Aeropostal’s fleet (2002-2005). Turns out, Aeropostal introduced the 727 in the early 2000s after their Airbus fleet renewal attempt became unviable. So as much as I love the 727, and while the aircraft does have a place in Aeropostal’s history, it is not an aircraft type generally associated with the airline’s good times. And for those that knew how to read the health of a country through the aviation thermometer, the fact that the then-largest airline in the country brought 727s to replace A320s in the XXI century meant that there was trouble brewing. Because of the not-so-great memories that I associate with this otherwise very special model in my collection, it takes the last place in the Top 5.


An airplane model in 1:400 scale of a Boeing 727-200 of Aeropostal
Aeropostal Boeing 727-224 Adv. N79749 1:400 by Phoenix Models. Notice the tiny name "Christine" in cursive on the nose area.

An airplane model in 1:400 scale of a Boeing 727-200 of Aeropostal
Aeropostal Boeing 727-224 Adv. N79749 1:400 by Phoenix Models

Number 4:


Avensa Boeing 727-2D3 Adv. YV-97C by Aeroclassics


I was expecting this model to rank higher on the list. Out of all the models in this ranking, Avensa 727s were the ones that I got to see the most throughout my entire childhood. Avensa 727s are the reason I fell in love with the legendary trijet, particularly the -200, and they are the epitome of the main focus of my collection. The urge to add an Avensa 727 to my collection is the sole reason I ventured into building kits and customizing die-cast models. Not to mention that I flew extensively on them (including my first flight), and YV-97C himself likely took me from MAR to MIA at least once sometime during the nineties. So how come this isn’t number one in the collection? I’ll explain.


There are two main reasons this model ranks so low in the Top 5, given how significant it is to me.


First, while I do remember seeing Avensa 727s wearing the livery this model wears, the livery that I remember the most is the one used in the late nineties, which consisted of a slightly different tail logo, and bare metal engines #1 and #3.


Also, since I spent countless hours looking at these birds up close from the MAR observation deck, as well as through the windows of MIA and CCS, I got used to seeing the rivet lines and oil stains. Don’t get me wrong, Aeroclassics produced a superb model, and I’m usually perfectly okay without a whole lot of extra details. But in this case, with such a simple livery, and based on my particular experiences with Avensa 727s, I need some more detail, maybe even a nose cone outline could go a long way. The model just looks too clean and simple and failed to impress me in the same way that the real thing did. Nonetheless, it is an Avensa 727-200, so it will always be in the top 5 no matter what.



An airplane model in 1:400 scale of a Boeing 727-200 of Avensa
Avensa Boeing 727-2D3 Adv. YV-97C 1:400 by Aeroclassics. I have to admit that after looking at the model from this angle I considered moving it up the list.

An airplane model in 1:400 scale of a Boeing 727-200 of Avensa
Avensa Boeing 727-2D3 Adv. YV-97C 1:400 by Aeroclassics

An airplane model in 1:400 scale of a Boeing 727-200 of Avensa